What Employers Want From Their Broker

Insurance is changing. And with these changes, Employers are looking to evolve their company’s benefit plans to not only offer the best value available, but also views their employees holistically and sees the need for them to achieve a satisfying work-life harmony. Providing solution based advice for employers can be a valuable benefit should they seek guidance.

Most employers are doing just that. According to insurance giant MetLife’s most recent benefit trends study, at least 81% of employers surveyed say an insurance agent or a broker plays a crucial role when they are developing their benefit plans, and another 75% say a benefits consultant or consulting firm assisted them during their renewal period.

As a guide to benefits advisers, as well as a helpful checklist for employers, MetLife has created a list of 15 areas that employers most often seek advice about from their agents or brokers, along with the percentage that inquiries about those specific benefit areas increased from 2015 to 2016. The areas range from providing global benefit solutions to healthcare reform requirements. The list provides an interesting insight into the changing landscape of employee benefits.

15 Employee Benefit Plan Specifics Companies Most Commonly Seek Advice About

  1. Providing assistance with creating and maintaining an employee benefit handbook: 2015 52% – 2016 62%. Putting together an employee handbook that is comprehensive and informative, yet easy to understand, and keeping it updated as needed, can be a daunting task for any HR department, even those with benefits specialists on staff. An insurance agent or broker can provide valuable guidance about best-practices and effective solutions.
  2. Providing prompt, effective service and answering questions on time: 2015 60% – 2016 68%. Great customer service is one of the keys to a great employee benefit plan. There’s nothing more frustrating than having to spend time on the phone and getting passed around to different departments just to get answers to basic questions about benefits.
  3. Recommending new and innovative benefit solutions: 2015 57% – 2016 65%. This is an important area these days, with so many new solutions coming onto the market, especially for smaller companies with 100 employees or less, towards which a lot of new products are being marketed. New technologies are rapidly changing the way employee benefits are administered.
  4. Recommending cost savings alternatives: 2015 61% – 2016 68%. Everyone is interested in saving money obviously, and an experienced agent or broker can recommend the best values for both employers and employees.
  5. Help with legal, regulatory, and compliance issues: 2015 56% – 2016 64%. With the complexity of the myriad government regulations and new legislation, it doesn’t take much for a company to run afoul of the rules, and incur severe penalties and fines. Professional advice in this area is almost a must.
  6. Providing insights on employee needs and desires for benefits: 2015 53% – 2016 63%. An agent who is experienced in advising on benefit plans for companies in a wide range of industries will be able to help tailor a plan for different types of employees. For instance, companies that hire mostly younger, single people will have different needs than companies that employ mostly older, married individuals.
  7. Reducing the frequency and expense of claims: 2015 56% – 2016 65%. An obvious goal of any employer, there are many ways to achieve it, including employee awareness and educational programs.
  8. Recommending non-medical benefit solutions: 2015 48% – 2016 58%. These are usually preventative programs such as exercise, diet, nutritional, and other health and wellness programs, but also non-traditional medical solutions such chiropractic, massage and aromatherapy, acupuncture, and herbal treatments, among many others.
  9. Advising on employee physical wellbeing strategy: 2015 50% – 2016 60%. This parallels #8 above, but might be considered a more comprehensive, holistic approach encompassing many elements, both physical and mental, leading to total wellbeing.
  10. Advising on employee financial wellbeing strategies: 2015 50% – 2016 60%. Financial stability is actually an important part of a holistic health strategy, as the stress associated with money problems can lead to serious mental and physical illnesses, as well as family issues including divorce and domestic violence.
  11. Creating benefits statements: 2015 52% – 2016 62%. Employees need clear, easy to understand benefits statements on a regular basis throughout the year, at least quarterly, so that they know their exact status. A professional can inform an employer on best practices and technologies for generating these important reports.
  12. Advising on healthcare reform requirements: 2015 57% – 2016 64%. Healthcare reform is one of the biggest political issues of the day, and employers need to keep abreast of changes in legislation that might affect their benefit plans, and what they need to do to stay in compliance with the law.
  13. Providing benefits administration: 2015 54% – 2016 64%. Administering benefit plans can be a huge task for larger companies, an no easy chore for smaller ones either. New technologies and platforms are making the job easier for both, and employers need to be aware of their options.
  14. Recommending product bundling that will meet employee needs: 2015 55% – 2016 64%. There are many products on the market today that can make managing employee benefit plans much easier and more efficient. Finding the right combination for a particular company’s needs requires a professional who is thoroughly familiar with what’s available and the strengths and weaknesses of specific products.
  15. Providing insights regarding benefits trends: 2015 54% – 2016 62%. Like just about everything else, benefits follow trends, and a good, up-to-date plan will take the latest ones into account. An agent or broker will be aware of these and can advise an employer accordingly.

 

Terry and Debbie Denesha have been advising businesses both large and small on their insurance and employee benefits plans for over a decade. Contact us at 661-397-0041 to arrange a consultation and find out how they can help create a plan to meet your company’s unique requirements.

 

 

What Is The Real Reason for Insurance?

Insurance is a misunderstood issue for a lot of people, but it is also one of the most important issues employers and employees will address. When you have a business and offer insurance to the people who work their, you need to be able to show them why insurance matters and what kinds of benefits they are really getting when they sign up. The more you understand about insurance, the more easily you can explain it to your employees in ways they are comfortable with. Then they can go on to make informed choices about whether they want to purchase insurance and what plan or policy they should select.

Transferring Risk Away From the Employee

The biggest benefit to your employees when they have insurance is that risk is transferred away from them. They will no longer have to pay for huge medical bills if something happens to them, like an accident or an illness, because the insurance company will be paying the majority of the bill. While insurance does not cover everything an employee might need to spend, and there will be out-of-pocket costs, employees can save themselves from financial ruin at the hands of medical bills if they have good insurance. That is a big benefit they receive when they work with an employer who offers a good insurance plan.

As an employer, you can show your employees that you care by helping them have good quality insurance at a reasonable price. There are only so many options open to employers, but picking the best plans and offering their information to your employees is a way to show that they matter. You will be taking some of the risk off of the employee and putting it in the hands of the insurance company, and when you can convey the message and value of that to your employees they will better understand why they should consider getting insurance through the company at the rates that are offered to them.

Employees Feel More Valued When They Are Offered Insurance

Employees who are offered insurance feel valued by their company more than employees who do not get any kind of insurance benefits. Because the employee and the employer both have to pay into the cost of the insurance, employees see that the company they work for is investing in them. Companies that offer insurance are saying to their employees that the employees are worth keeping, and that their health and safety matters. By providing this understanding of value to your employees, you show them they are important and they mean something to the company they work for. That can affect loyalty and performance.

Having Good Insurance Plans Can Mean Better Employment Candidates

An important benefit employers get when they offer good health insurance plans is a better pool of job candidates to choose from. People who are looking for employment often want more than just a paycheck, and if they see that they can get good insurance through one company but not through another company that is comparable in pay and job duties, most of them will choose the company where they can receive insurance. Having insurance is about more than just keeping employees from going broke if they are injured or sick. It is also about acquiring and retaining the best employees for the job at hand.

It’s Easier to Pick From a Few, Company-Provided Options

Self-employed people often struggle with how and where to choose an insurance plan. For company employees, though, that struggle is avoided. There are just a few options offered, and employees can pick the ones that work best for them. That eliminates the possibility of having too many choices, and the decision fatigue that can come along with it. In short, it helps employees make better choices, because too many choices generally leads people to pick something that actually is not right for them. By limiting employee choices for insurance, you are doing them a favor and making things much easier for them, overall.

Insurance Can Motivate Employees to Work Harder

Giving bonuses and other incentives, along with the idea that they will be protected by insurance if the company keeps them on after their probationary period of up, can all encourage employees to work harder. They want to do more for a company that treats them right, and that cares about them and their lives. That is good news for any company that offers insurance, because happy, productive employees are so important to the proper running of any company. Without good employees, many companies are left struggling. Sometimes as simple as providing insurance can change motivation levels and improve the bottom line.

Good Insurance Means Employees May Remain On the Job Longer

When employees have good insurance through their employer, another thing they may do is stay on the job longer. When they quit they will lose their insurance, and if the choose to keep it the price often rises drastically. If they change jobs they may not be covered by the other company for a while, or the other company they are considering may not have as good of an insurance plan. In some cases, the other company may not have an insurance plan at all. That can make a significant difference in how long a person chooses to work for a company, and if they stay even if other opportunities are available.

The Bottom Line on Insurance

Because insurance is a transfer of risk from the employee to the insurance company, it helps to protect the employee financially if there is an injury or illness. Additionally, employees feel much more valued and important to the company if they are offered insurance, which can lead them to stay with the company longer and work harder than they otherwise would. Good insurance plans can also bring in other employees who are dedicated and talented, and their lives are made easier by not having to choose from too many insurance plans. When insurance is handled the right way, It is a winning situation for both the employees and their employer.

Five Most Common Open Enrollment Mistakes

A company’s open enrollment period can be a hectic time for management, HR staff, and employees alike. While a successful open enrollment period can increase employee health and satisfaction, an unsuccessful open enrollment period can result in compliance risk and reputational damage.

Learn the five most common open enrollment mistakes and how to avoid them below.

Mistake #1: Not Informing Employees of the Value of the Health Plan

Retention is greatly increased when employees understand the value of their employer-sponsored health plan. To aid this understanding, employers should consider providing their employees with:

  • A well-organized benefits summary which addresses the key features of the health plan; and
  • A total compensation statement which emphasizes that health plan benefits are a form of compensation received by the employee.

Mistake #2: Not Informing Employees of Health Plan Changes

If the employee has not experienced a job or family change, he or she may simply re-enroll in the health plan without giving it a second thought. However, health plan premiums, deductibles, and coverage networks may change each plan year, and the employer may be offering new benefits with unique requirements. As a result, it is important for the employer to inform employees of plan changes. Employers should consider using tools such as benefits summary documents, emails, in-person meetings, and social media posts to help ensure that employees fully understand their health benefits.

Mistake # 3: Not Responding to Employee Questions or Concerns

Some employees may have specific questions about the health plan which go unaddressed, while others may want a benefit that is not part of the current health plan. Employers should be mindful of these concerns and seek to better understand what employees want from their health plan. By using online surveys and other methods to obtain employee feedback during open enrollment, employers can satisfy concerned employees and learn how to enhance their health plan.

Mistake #4: Not Offering Coverage to Dependents

Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), employers with 50 or more full-time employees (including full-time equivalent employees) may be liable for a penalty of over $3,000 per full-time employee if they do not offer coverage to the dependents of their full-time employees. In addition, the ACA requires all plans that offer dependent coverage to offer coverage to plan enrollees’ adult children until they reach age 26, even if the child is eligible for coverage through his or her own employer. As a result, it is very important for employers to offer dependent coverage and inform employeesof its availability.

Mistake #5: Not Fully Explaining any Tax-Favored Accounts Offered

To take the sting out of high plan deductibles and other out-of-pocket costs borne by employees, many employers have begun offering health savings accounts (HSAs), health flexible spending arrangements (health FSAs), and health reimbursement arrangements (HRAs) in conjunction with their health plans. However, the rules governing these tax-favored accounts can be complicated, and violations of their specific participation, contribution, and distribution requirements can lead to tax penalties. Employers should take the time to fully explain any tax-favored account they offer, and remember to emphasize that the employer’s establishment of and contribution to these accounts is yet another part of the employee’s total compensation.

 

 

Medicare Information Booklet

MedicareWhat’s inside
Contacting Social Security 3
Medicare 4
What is Medicare? 4
Who can get Medicare? 6
Help for some low-income people 9
Signing up for Medicare 10
Choices for receiving health services 15
If you have other health insurance 15Contacting Social Security
Visit our website
At our website, www.socialsecurity.gov, you can:
• Create a my Social Security account to review your
Social Security Statement, verify your earnings, print
a beneft verifcation letter, change your direct deposit
information, request a replacement Medicare card, get a
replacement 1099/1042S, and more;
• Apply for Extra Help with Medicare prescription drug
plan costs;
• Apply for retirement, disability, and Medicare benefts;
• Get the address of your local Social Security offce;
• Find copies of our publications; and
• Get answers to frequently asked questions.
Call us
Call us toll-free at 1-800-772-1213 or at our TTY number,
1-800-325-0778, if you’re deaf or hard of hearing.
We provide general information by automated phone
service 24 hours a day. You can also use this automated
response system to tell us a new address or request a
replacement Medicare card. We can answer your casespecifc questions from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through
Friday. You’ll generally have a shorter wait time if you call
after Tuesday.
We treat all calls confdentially, and a second Social
Security representative monitors some telephone calls,
because we want to make sure you receive accurate and
courteous service.4
Medicare
This booklet provides basic information about what
Medicare is, who’s covered, and some of the options
you have for choosing Medicare coverage. For the latest
information about Medicare, visit the website or call the
toll-free number listed below.
Medicare
Website: www.Medicare.gov
Toll-free number: 1-800-MEDICARE
(1-800-633-4227)
TTY number: 1-877-486-2048
What is Medicare?
Medicare is our country’s health insurance program
for people age 65 or older. People younger than age 65
with certain disabilities, or permanent kidney failure, or
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease), can
also qualify for Medicare. The program helps with the cost
of health care, but it doesn’t cover all medical expenses or
the cost of most long-term care. You have choices for how
you get Medicare coverage. If you choose to have original
Medicare coverage, you can buy a Medicare supplement
policy (called Medigap) from a private insurance company
to cover some of the costs that Medicare does not.
A portion of the payroll taxes paid by workers and
their employers cover most Medicare expenses. Monthly
premiums, usually deducted from Social Security checks
also cover a portion of the costs.
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is the
agency in charge of the Medicare program. But, you apply
for Medicare at Social Security, and we can give you general
information about the Medicare program.5
Medicare has four parts
• Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) helps pay for
inpatient care in a hospital or skilled nursing facility
(following a hospital stay). Part A also pays for some
home health care, and hospice care.
• Medicare Part B (medical insurance) helps pay for
services from doctors and other health care providers,
outpatient care, home health care, durable medical
equipment, and some preventive services.
• Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage plans) are
available in many areas. People with Medicare Parts A
and B can choose to receive all their health care services
through a private insurance company approved by
Medicare to provide this coverage.
• Medicare Part D (Medicare prescription drug coverage)
helps cover the cost of prescription drugs.
You can get more details about what Medicare covers
from Medicare & You (Publication No. CMS-10050). To
get a copy, call the toll-free number or go to the Medicare
website shown on the previous page.
A word about Medicaid
You may think Medicaid and Medicare are the same,
but they’re two different programs. Medicaid is a staterun program that provides hospital and medical coverage
for people with low income. Each state has its own rules
about who’s eligible, and what Medicaid covers. Some
people qualify for both Medicare and Medicaid. For more
information about the Medicaid program, contact your local
medical assistance agency or social services offce.6
Who can get Medicare?
Medicare Part A (hospital insurance)
People age 65 or older, who are citizens or permanent
residents of the United States, are eligible for Medicare Part
A. You’re eligible for “Part A” at no cost at age 65 if:
• You receive or are eligible to receive Social Security
benefts; or
• You receive or are eligible to receive railroad retirement
benefts; or
• Your spouse (living or deceased, including divorced
spouses) receives or is eligible to receive Social Security
or railroad retirement benefts; or
• You or your spouse worked long enough in a government
job through which you paid Medicare taxes; or
• You are the dependent parent of a fully insured
deceased child.
If you don’t meet these requirements, you may be able
to get Medicare Part A by paying a monthly premium.
Usually, you can purchase this coverage only during
designated enrollment periods.
NOTE: Even though Social Security’s full retirement
age is no longer 65, you should sign up for Medicare three
months before your 65th birthday. You can apply on our
website at www.socialsecurity.gov.
Before age 65, you are eligible for Medicare Part A at no
cost if:
• You’ve been entitled to Social Security disability
benefts for 24 months; or
• You receive a disability pension from the railroad
retirement board and meet certain conditions; or
• You receive Social Security disability benefts because you
have Lou Gehrig’s disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis); or
• You worked long enough in a government job through
which you paid Medicare taxes, and you’ve been entitled
to Social Security disability benefts for 24 months; or7
• You’re the child or widow(er) age 50 or older, including
a divorced widow(er), of someone who’s worked long
enough in a government job through which Medicare
taxes were paid, and you meet the requirements of the
Social Security disability program; or
• You have permanent kidney failure and you receive
maintenance dialysis or a kidney transplant and
—You’re eligible for or receive monthly benefts under
Social Security or the railroad retirement system; or
—You’ve worked long enough in a Medicare-covered
government job; or
—You’re the child or spouse (including a divorced spouse)
of a worker (living or deceased) who has worked long
enough under Social Security or in a Medicare-covered
government job.
Medicare Part B (medical insurance)
Anyone who’s eligible for Medicare Part A at no cost
can enroll in Medicare Part B by paying a monthly
premium. Some people with higher incomes will
pay a higher monthly Part B premium. For more
information, read Medicare Premiums: Rules for
Higher-Income Benefciaries (Publication No. 05-10536),
or visit www.socialsecurity.gov/mediinfo.htm.
If you’re not eligible for Part A at no cost, you can buy
Part B, without having to buy Part A, if you’re age 65 or
older and you’re:
• A U.S. citizen; or
• A lawfully admitted noncitizen, who has lived in the
United States for at least fve years.
You can only sign up for Part B during designated
enrollment periods. If you don’t enroll in Part B when
you’re frst eligible for it, you may have to pay a late
enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part B coverage.
Read Signing up for Medicare on page 10.8
Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage plans)
If you receive your Part A and Part B benefts directly
from the government, you have original Medicare. If
you receive your benefts from a Medicare Advantage
organization or other company approved by Medicare,
you have a Medicare Advantage plan. Many of these
plans provide extra coverage and may lower your
out-of-pocket costs.
If you have Medicare Parts A and B, you can join a
Medicare Advantage plan. Private companies, approved
by Medicare, offer Medicare Advantage plans. With these
plans, you can’t have a Medigap policy, because Medicare
Advantage plans cover many of the same benefts a Medigap
policy covers. This includes benefts like extra days in the
hospital after you’ve used days that Medicare covers.
Medicare Advantage plans include:
• Medicare managed-care plans;
• Medicare preferred provider organization plans;
• Medicare private fee-for-service plans; and
• Medicare specialty plans.
If you decide to join a Medicare Advantage plan, you use
the health card that you get from your Medicare Advantage
plan provider for your health care. Also, you might have to
pay a monthly premium for your Medicare Advantage plan
because of the extra benefts it offers.
You can enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan during your
initial enrollment period (as explained under Signing up
for Medicare on page 10), the frst time you’re eligible for
Medicare. You can also enroll during the annual Medicare
open enrollment period from October 15 – December 7
each year. The effective date for the enrollment is January 1
of the upcoming year. There are also special enrollment
periods for some situations.9
Medicare Part D (Medicare prescription
drug coverage)
Anyone who has Medicare Part A or Part B is eligible
for Part D (Medicare prescription drug coverage). Joining
a Medicare prescription drug plan is voluntary, and
you pay an extra monthly premium for the coverage.
Some benefciaries with higher incomes will pay a
higher monthly Part D premium. For more information,
read Medicare Premiums: Rules for Higher-Income
Benefciaries (Publication No. 05-10536), or visit
www.socialsecurity.gov/mediinfo.htm. If you don’t
enroll in a Medicare drug plan when you’re frst eligible,
you may pay a late enrollment penalty if you join a plan
later. You’ll have to pay this penalty for as long as you
have Medicare prescription drug coverage. However, you
won’t pay a penalty if you have Extra Help (see below), or
another creditable prescription drug plan. To be creditable,
the coverage must pay, on average, at least as much as
Medicare’s standard prescription coverage.
You can enroll during your initial enrollment period (as
explained under Signing up for Medicare on page 10), the
frst time you’re eligible for Medicare. You can also enroll
during the annual Medicare open enrollment period from
October 15 – December 7 each year. The effective date for
the enrollment is January 1 of the upcoming year. There are
also special enrollment periods for some situations.
Help for some low-income people
If you can’t afford to pay your Medicare premiums and
other medical costs, you may be able to get help from
your state. States offer programs for people entitled to
Medicare who have low income. Some programs may pay
for Medicare premiums and some pay Medicare deductibles
and coinsurance. To qualify, you must have Medicare Part
A and have limited income and resources.10
You can go online to get more information about these
programs from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid
Services website. Visit www.medicare.gov/publications
and fnd Get help with your Medicare costs (Publication
No. CMS-10126) at the “Your Medicare Costs” tab.
Only your state can decide if you qualify for help under
these programs. To fnd out, contact your state or local
medical assistance (Medicaid) agency, social services, or
welfare offce.
You may also be able to get Extra Help paying for the
annual deductibles, monthly premiums, and prescription
co-payments related to the Medicare prescription drug
program (Part D). You may qualify for Extra Help if you
have limited income (tied to the federal poverty level)
and limited resources. These income and resource limits
usually change each year, and you can contact us for the
current numbers.
You automatically qualify and don’t need to apply for
Extra Help if you have Medicare and meet one of the
following conditions:
• Have full Medicaid coverage;
• Have Supplemental Security Income (SSI); or
• Take part in a state program that pays your
Medicare premiums.
For more information about getting help with your
prescription drug costs, call Social Security’s toll-free
number or visit our website. You can also apply online
at www.socialsecurity.gov/extrahelp.
Signing up for Medicare
When should I apply?
If you’re already getting Social Security benefts or railroad
retirement checks, we’ll send you information a few months
before you become eligible for Medicare. If you live in one
of the 50 states, Washington, D.C., the Northern Mariana
Islands, Guam, American Samoa, or the U.S. Virgin Islands,11
we’ll automatically enroll you in Medicare Parts A and
B. However, because you must pay a premium for Part B
coverage, you can choose to turn it down.
NOTE: Residents of Puerto Rico or foreign countries won’t
receive Part B automatically. They must elect this beneft.
If you’re not already getting benefts, you should contact
Social Security about three months before your 65th
birthday to sign up for Medicare. You can sign up for
Medicare even if you don’t plan to retire at age 65.
After you enroll in Medicare, you’ll receive a red,
white, and blue Medicare card showing whether you
have Part A, Part B or both. Keep your card in a safe
place so you’ll have it when you need it. If your card
is lost or stolen, you can apply for a replacement card
online by setting up a my Social Security account at
www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount, or call Social
Security’s toll-free number. You’ll also receive a Medicare &
You handbook (Publication No. CMS-10050) that describes
your Medicare benefts and plan choices.
Special enrollment situations
You should also contact Social Security about applying
for Medicare if:
• You’re a disabled widow or widower between age 50
and age 65, but haven’t applied for disability benefts
because you’re already getting another kind of
Social Security beneft;
• You’re a government employee and became disabled
before age 65;
• You, your spouse, or your dependent child has
permanent kidney failure;
• You had Medicare Part B in the past, but dropped
the coverage;
• You turned down Medicare Part B when you frst got
Part A; or
• You or your spouse worked for the railroad industry.12
Initial enrollment period for Part B
When you frst become eligible for Medicare Part A, you
have a seven-month period (your initial enrollment period)
in which to sign up for Part B. If you’re eligible at age 65,
your initial enrollment period begins three months before
your 65th birthday, includes the month you turn age 65,
and ends three months after that birthday. If you’re eligible
for Medicare based on disability or permanent kidney
failure, your initial enrollment period depends on the date
your disability or treatment began.
NOTE: If you don’t enroll in Part B when you’re frst
eligible for it, you may have to pay a late enrollment
penalty for as long as you have Part B coverage. Also, you
may have to wait to enroll, which will delay this coverage.
When does my enrollment in Part B
become effective?
If you accept the automatic enrollment in Medicare Part B,
or if you enroll during the frst three months of your initial
enrollment period, your coverage will start with the month
you’re frst eligible. If you enroll during the last four months,
your coverage will start from one to three months after
you enroll.
The following chart shows when your Medicare Part B
becomes effective:
If you enroll in this month of
your initial enrollment period
Then your Part B Medicare
coverage starts
One to three months before you
reach age 65 The month you reach age 65
The month you reach age 65 One month after the month you
reach age 65
One month after you reach age 65 Two months after the month of enrollment
Two or three months after you
reach age 65
Three months after the month of
enrollment13
General enrollment period for Part B
If you don’t enroll in Medicare Part B during your
initial enrollment period, you have another chance each
year to sign up during a “general enrollment period” from
January 1 through March 31. Your coverage begins on July 1
of the year you enroll. However, you may have to pay a late
enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part B coverage
Your monthly premium will go up 10 percent for each
12-month period you were eligible for Part B, but didn’t
sign up for it
Special enrollment period for people leaving Part C
If you’re in a Medicare Part C (Medicare Advantage plan),
you can leave that plan and switch to original Medicare
from January 1 through February 14. If you use this
option, you also have until February 14 to join a Medicare
Part D (Medicare prescription drug plan). Your coverage
begins the frst day of the month after the plan gets your
enrollment form.
Special enrollment period for people covered under
an employer group health plan
If you’re 65 or older and covered under a group health
plan, either from your own or your spouse’s current
employment, you may have a “special enrollment period”
in which to sign up for Medicare Part B. This means that
you may delay enrolling in Medicare Part B without having
to wait for a general enrollment period and paying the
penalty for late enrollment. There are limits, so we strongly
advise you to contact the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid
Services (CMS) for more information. The CMS contact
information is on page 4 of this booklet. The rules allow
you to:
• Enroll in Medicare Part B any time while you have a
group health plan based on current employment; or
• Enroll in Medicare Part B during the eight-month period
that begins the month after the employment ends or the
group health coverage ends, whichever happens frst.14
You can’t enroll using a special enrollment period if your
employment or the employer-provided group health plan
coverage ends during your initial enrollment period.
When you enroll in Medicare Part B while you’re still in
the group health plan, or during the frst full month when
you are no longer in the plan, your coverage begins either:
• On the frst day of the month you enroll; or
• By your choice, on the frst day of any of the following
three months.
If you enroll during any of the remaining seven months
of the “special enrollment period,” your Medicare Part B
coverage begins on the frst day of the following month.
If you don’t enroll by the end of the eight-month period,
you’ll have to wait until the next general enrollment period,
which begins January 1 of the next year. You may also have
to pay a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part
B coverage, as described previously.
If you get Social Security disability benefts and have
coverage under a large group health plan from either your
own or a family member’s current employment, you may
also have a special enrollment period. If so, you have
premium rights similar to those for current workers age
65 or older. For more information, contact the Centers for
Medicare & Medicaid Services.
NOTE: COBRA and retiree health coverage don’t count
as current employer coverage.15
Choices for receiving health services
Medicare benefciaries can have choices for getting
health care services.
You can get more information about your health care
choices from the following publications:
• Medicare & You (Publication No. CMS-10050) — CMS
mails this guide to people after they enroll in Medicare
and sends them an updated version each year after that.
• Choosing a Medigap Policy: A Guide to Health
Insurance for People with Medicare (Publication
No. CMS-02110) — This guide describes how other
health insurance plans supplement Medicare and offers
some shopping hints for people looking at those plans.
To get a copy of these publications, visit
Medicare.gov/publications, or call the toll-free number,
1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). If you’re deaf or hard
of hearing, call TTY 1-877-486-2048.
If you have other health insurance
Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) is free for almost
everyone. You have to pay a monthly premium for Medicare
Part B (medical insurance). If you already have other health
insurance when you become eligible for Medicare, is it
worth the monthly premium cost to sign up for Part B?
The answer varies with each person and the kind of other
health insurance you have. Although we can’t give you
“yes” or “no” answers, we can offer information that can
help you decide. We can also advise if you’ll be subject to a
late enrollment penalty if you delay signing up.16
If you have a private insurance plan
Get in touch with your insurance agent to see how your
private plan fts with Medicare Part B. This is especially
important if you have family members who have coverage
under the same policy. And remember, just as Medicare
doesn’t cover all health services, most private plans
don’t either. In planning your health insurance coverage,
keep in mind that most nursing home care isn’t covered
by Medicare or private health insurance policies. One
important word of caution: For your own protection, do
not cancel any health insurance you now have until your
Medicare coverage begins
If you have insurance from an employer-provided
group health plan
By law, group health plans of employers with 20 or
more employees have to offer current workers and their
spouses who are age 65 (or older) the same health benefts as
younger workers.
If you or your spouse are still working and covered
under an employer-provided group health plan, talk to the
personnel offce before signing up for Medicare Part B.
If you have health care protection from other plans
If you have TRICARE (insurance for active-duty, military
retirees, and their families), your health benefts can change
or end when you become eligible for Medicare. This applies
for any reason, regardless of age or place of residence. If you’re
retired from the military or are a military retiree’s family
member, you must enroll in Part A and Part B when frst
eligible to keep TRICARE coverage. You can fnd a military
health benefts adviser at milconnect.dmdc.mil, or call the
Defense Manpower Data Center, toll-free at 1-800-538-9552
(TTY 1-866-363-2883) before you decide whether to enroll in
Medicare medical insurance (Part B).17
If you have health care protection from the Indian Health
Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, or a state medical
assistance program, contact those offces to help you decide
if it’s to your advantage to have Medicare Part B.
IMPORTANT: If you have VA coverage and don’t enroll
in Part B when you’re frst eligible, you may have to pay
a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part B
coverage. Also, you may have to wait to enroll, which will
delay this coverage.
For more information on how other health insurance
plans work with Medicare, visit Medicare.gov/publications
to view the booklet Medicare and Other Health Benefts:
Your Guide to Who Pays First (Publication No. CMS-02179),
or call the Medicare toll-free number, 1-800-MEDICARE
(1-800-633-4227). If you’re deaf or hard of hearing,
call TTY 1-877-486-2048.18
Notes19
NotesPrinted on recycled paper
Produced and published at U.S. taxpayer expense
Social Security Administration
SSA Publication No. 05-10043
ICN 460000
Unit of Issue (HD – one hundred)
April 2016 (Recycle prior editions)

Tax Forms 1095-A, 1095-B & 1095-C Q&A

Document will be available ASAP.

Tax Forms
1095-A, 1095-B
& 1095-C Q&A
Because of the health care law, you
might receive some new forms this
winter providing you with
information about the health
coverage you had or were offered
in 2015. The information below is
intended to help individuals
understand these new forms,
including who should expect to
receive them and what to do with
them.
The Basics
1. Will I receive any new health
care tax forms in 2016 to help
me complete my tax return?
Starting in early 2016, you may
receive one or more forms
providing information about the
health care coverage that you had
or were offered during the previous
year. Much like Form W-2 and Form
1099, which include information
about the income you received,
these new health care forms
provide information that you may
need when you fle your individual
income tax return. Also, like Forms
W-2 and 1099, these new forms will be provided to the IRS by the
entity that provides the form to you.
The new forms are:
 Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace
Statement. The Health Insurance Marketplace
(Marketplace) sends this form to individuals who enrolled in
coverage there, with information about the coverage, who
was covered, and when.
 Form 1095-B, Health Coverage. Health insurance
providers (for example, health insurance companies) send
this form to individuals they cover, with information about
who was covered and when.
 Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance
Offer and Coverage. Certain employers send this form to
certain employees, with information about what coverage
the employer offered. Employers that offer health coverage
referred to as “self-insured coverage” send this form to
individuals they cover, with information about who was
covered and when.
2. When will I receive these health care tax forms?
The deadline for the Marketplace to provide Form 1095-A is Feb. 1,
2016. The deadline for insurers, other coverage providers and
certain employers to provide Forms 1095-B and 1095-C has been
extended to March 31, 2016. Individual taxpayers will generally not
be affected by this extension and should fle their returns as they
normally would.
Due to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), some taxpayers
may receive unfamiliar tax forms at the beginning of
2016: Forms 1095-A, 1095-B and1095-C.
3. Must I wait to fle until I
receive these forms?
If you are expecting to receive a Form 1095-A, you should wait to
fle your 2015 income tax return until you receive that form.
However, it is not necessary to wait for Forms 1095-B or 1095-C in
order to fle.
Some taxpayers may not receive a Form 1095-B or Form 1095-C by the time they are ready to fle their
2015 tax returns. While the information on these forms may assist in preparing a return, they are not
required. Individual taxpayers will generally not be affected by this extension and should fle their returns
as they normally would.
Like last year, taxpayers can prepare and fle their returns using other information about their health
insurance. You should not attach any of these forms to your tax return.
4. What are the health care tax forms that I might receive and how do I use them?
Health Care
Form
Sent to Sent by What to do with this form
Form 1095-A,
Health
Insurance
Marketplace
Statement
Individuals who enrolled
in health coverage for
themselves or their
family members
through the
Marketplace
Marketplace This form provides information about your
Marketplace coverage.
Use Form 1095-A to complete Form 8962 and to
reconcile advance payments of the premium
tax credit or claim the premium tax credit on
your tax return.
Use Form 1095-A for information on whether you
and your family members had coverage that
satisfes the individual shared responsibility
provision.
 If Form 1095-A shows coverage for you and
everyone in your family for the entire year,
check the full-year coverage box on your tax
return.
 If there are months when you or your family
members did not have coverage, determine if
you qualify for an exemption or must make an
individual shared responsibility payment.
Do not attach Form 1095-A to your tax return—
keep it with your tax records.
Form 1095-B,
Health
Coverage
Individuals who had
health coverage for
themselves or their
family members that is
not reported on Form
Health Coverage
Providers
 Insurance
companies
This form provides information about your health
coverage.
Use Form 1095-B for information on whether you
and your family members had health coverage.
1095-A or Form 1095-C outside the
Marketplace
 Government
agencies such as
Medicare or CHIP
 Employers that
provide certain
kinds of health
coverage
(sometimes
referred to as
“self-insured
coverage”) but
are not required
to send Form
1095-C (see
below)
 Other coverage
providers
that satisfes the individual shared
responsibility provision.
 If Form 1095-B shows coverage for you and
everyone in your family for the entire year,
check the full-year coverage box on your tax
return.
 If there are months when you or your family
members did not have coverage, determine if
you qualify for an exemption or must make
an individual shared responsibility
payment.
Do not attach Form 1095-B to your tax return—
keep it with your tax records.
Form 1095-C,
EmployerProvided Health
Insurance Offer
and Coverage
Certain employees of
applicable large
employers (See next
column)
Applicable large
employers—
generally those with
50 or more full-time
employees, including
full-time equivalent
employees
Form 1095-C provides information about the
health coverage offered by your employer, and,
in some cases, information about whether you
enrolled in this coverage.
Use Form 1095-C to help determine your
eligibility for the premium tax credit.
 If you enrolled in a health plan in the
Marketplace, you may need the information
in Part II of Form 1095-C to help determine
your eligibility for the premium tax credit.
 If you did not enroll in a health plan in the
Marketplace, the information in Part II of your
Form 1095-C is not relevant to you.
Use Form 1095-C for information on whether you
or any family members enrolled in certain kinds
of coverage offered by your employer
(sometimes referred to as “self-insured
coverage”).
 If Form 1095-C shows coverage for you and
everyone in your family for the entire year,
check the full-year coverage box on your tax
return
 If there are months when you or your family
members did not have coverage, determine if
you qualify for an exemption or must make
an individual shared responsibility
payment
Do not attach Form 1095-C to your tax return—
keep it with your tax records.
5. How will I receive these forms?
The Marketplace, health coverage providers and applicable large employers will mail (or hand deliver)
these forms to you or provide them electronically to you, if you have consented to electronic delivery.
6. My employer or health coverage provider has suggested that I opt to receive these forms
electronically rather than on paper. Are they allowed to ask me that?
Yes. Employers and health coverage providers may ask for your consent to receive the forms electronically.
This is entirely acceptable and may be more convenient for you. Electronic forms provide the same
information that is provided in the paper forms.
7. Will I get at least one form?
Maybe. If you were enrolled in health coverage for 2015, you should receive a Form 1095-A, 1095-B or
1095-C. In addition, if you were an employee of an employer that was an applicable large employer in
2015, you may receive a Form 1095-C. If you don’t fall in either of these categories, you won’t receive a
form.
8. Will I get more than one form?
Maybe. You are likely to get more than one form if you had coverage from more than one coverage
provider or if you worked for more than one employer that offered coverage. You are also likely to get more
than one form if you changed coverage or employers during the year or if different members of your family
received coverage from different coverage providers.
The following examples illustrate when you may get more than one Form 1095 and what to do with the
information on those forms.
Example 1: You are single with two dependent children. At the beginning of 2015, you were unemployed,
and you and your children were enrolled in coverage through the Marketplace. You received the beneft of
advance payments of the premium tax credit to help pay for your coverage. In August of 2015, you started
working 40 hours per week for an employer with 300 employees (an applicable large employer) that
offered health insurance coverage to you and your children. However, that offer of coverage was
considered unaffordable to you for purposes of the premium tax credit, so you did not enroll in it and
instead continued your Marketplace coverage with advance payments of the premium tax credit. Early in
2016, you receive Form 1095-A (from the Marketplace) and Form 1095-C (from your employer).
When you complete Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit, you will use the information on Form 1095-A to
reconcile advance payments of the premium tax credit and to verify that you had health coverage for the
entire year. You will use Form 1095-C to verify that your employer coverage was unaffordable for you. You
will not attach Form 1095-A or 1095-C to your return, but you should keep these forms with your tax
records.
Example 2: You are single with no dependents. At the beginning of 2015, you were employed by
Employer A, which has 20 employees (and therefore is not an applicable large employer). You had
coverage through Employer A’s employer-sponsored plan, which is insurance that Employer A purchases
from Health Insurance Issuer Q (i.e., not a “self-insured plan”). In June of 2015, you changed jobs and
started working 40 hours per week for Employer B, which has 500 employees (an applicable large
employer). You immediately began receiving coverage through that employer’s plan, which is insurance it
purchases from Insurance Issuer R. Early in 2016, both insurance companies will send you a Form 1095-B
providing information about the coverage in which you were enrolled. You also will receive a Form 1095-C
from Employer B, the applicable large employer, providing information about the health coverage
Employer B offered you.
You will use the information on Forms 1095-B to verify that you had health coverage for each month during
the year and will check the full-year coverage box on your tax return. You will not need to use Form 1095-C
to help complete your return because the information about the offer of health coverage made by your
employer relates to whether you are eligible for the premium tax credit, and you cannot get a premium tax
credit if you were not enrolled in a health plan in the Marketplace. You will not attach Form 1095-B or Form
1095-C to your tax return, but you should keep both forms with your tax records.
9. Will I get a Form 1095-C from each of my employers?
Not necessarily. You will only receive a Form 1095-C from your employer if that employer is an applicable
large employer, meaning it had 50 or more full-time employees (including full-time equivalent employees)
in the year before the year to which the form relates. Most employers have fewer than 50 employees, and,
therefore, are not applicable large employers required to provide Form 1095-C to their full-time employees.
Even if your employer is an applicable large employer, you will only receive a Form 1095-C for that
employer if you were a full-time employee for that employer for at least one month of the year, or if you
are enrolled in an applicable large employer’s self-insured health plan, even if you are a part-time
employee.
10. How are the forms similar?
They all provide information about your health coverage during the prior year, and they are all used to
determine if you, your spouse and your dependents had health coverage for the entire year, and, if not, for
which months you did have coverage. (The Form 1095-C includes this information only if your employer is
an applicable large employer and the coverage you enrolled in was a certain kind of coverage referred to
as “self-insured coverage”).
None of these forms should be fled with your tax return; they should be kept for your records with your
other tax documents.
11. How are the forms different?
 The forms are provided by different entities.
o Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement, is provided by the Marketplace to
individuals who enrolled or who have enrolled a family member in health coverage through the
Marketplace.
o Form 1095-B, Health Coverage, is provided by insurance companies and other coverage
providers. However, if your coverage was purchased through the Marketplace or was a type of
coverage referred to as “self-insured coverage” that was provided by an applicable large
employer, you will receive a different form.
o Form 1095-C, Employer-Provided Health Insurance Offer and Coverage, is issued by applicable
large employers to their full-time employees, and, in some cases, to other employees.
 The forms are provided to different groups of people.
o Form 1095-A – Only individuals who enroll in coverage through the Marketplace will get this
form.
o Form 1095-B – Individuals who have health coverage outside of the Marketplace will get this
form (except for employees of applicable large employers that provide self-insured
coverage, who will receive Form 1095-C instead).
o Form 1095-C – Individuals who work full-time for applicable large employers will get this
form. Also, part-time employees also will get this form if they enroll in self-insured coverage
provided by an applicable large employer.
 The forms contain some different information. Form 1095-A, Form 1095-B and some Forms 1095-C
show who in your family enrolled in health coverage and for what months. Form 1095-A also
provides premium information and other information you will need to reconcile advance payments
of premium tax credit and claim the premium tax credit on Form 8962. And Form 1095-C shows
coverage that your employer offered to you even if you chose not to take that coverage.
12. What do I need to do with these forms?
You will use the information on these forms to verify that you, your spouse and any dependents had
coverage for each month during the year.
Like last year, if you and your family members had minimum essential coverage for every month of the
year, you will check a box on your return to report that coverage. If you or any family members did not
have coverage for the entire year, a coverage exemption may apply for the months without coverage. If
you or any family members did not have coverage or an exemption, you may have to make an individual
shared responsibility payment.
If you or anyone in your family receives a Form 1095-A from the Marketplace, you will use the information
on the form to complete a Form 8962 to reconcile any advance payments of the premium tax credit or to
claim the premium tax credit.
Do not fle these forms with your tax return. Keep them in your records with your other important tax
documents.
13. What should I do if:
 I have a question about the form I received?
 I think I should have gotten a form but did not get it?
 I need a replacement form?
 I believe the form I received has an error?
In any of these situations, you should contact the provider of the form (or the entity that you think should
have provided you a form, if you think you should have received a form but did not get it).
For questions about the Form 1095-A, contact the Marketplace. For questions about the Form 1095-B,
contact the coverage provider (see Line 18 of the Form 1095-B for a contact telephone number). For
questions about the Form 1095-C, contact your employer (see Line 10 of Form 1095-C for a contact
telephone number).
How the Forms Relate to Your Tax Return
14. Can I fle my tax return if I have not received any or all of these forms?
If you enrolled in coverage through the Marketplace, you will need the information on Form 1095-A to
complete Form 8962 to reconcile any advance payments of the premium tax credit or claim the premium
tax credit, and to fle a complete and accurate tax return. If you need a copy of your Form 1095-A, you
should go to www.healthcare.gov or your state Marketplace website and log in to your Marketplace
account, or call your Marketplace call center. Although information from the Form 1095-C—information
about an offer of employer provided coverage—can assist you in determining eligibility for the premium
tax credit, it is not necessary to have Form 1095-C to fle your return. See Publication 974 for additional
information on claiming the premium tax credit.
You do not have to wait for either Form 1095-B or 1095-C from your coverage provider or employer to fle
your individual income tax return. You can use other forms of documentation, in lieu of the Form 1095
information returns to prepare your tax return. Other forms of documentation that would provide proof of
your insurance coverage include the following:
 Insurance cards
 Explanation of benefts
 Statements from your insurer
 W-2 or payroll statements reflecting health insurance deductions
 Records of advance payments of the premium tax credit
 Other statements indicating that you, or a member of your family, had health care coverage
If you and your entire family were covered for the entire year, you may check the full-year coverage box on
your return. If you or your family members did not have coverage for one or more months of the calendar
year, you may claim an exemption or make an individual shared responsibility payment.
You will not need to send the IRS proof of your health coverage. However, you should keep any
documentation with your other tax records. This includes records of your family’s employer-provided
coverage, premiums paid and type of coverage.
15. Am I required to fle a tax return if I receive one of these forms?
If you receive a Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement, showing that advance payments of
the premium tax credit were paid for coverage for you or your family member, you generally must fle an
individual income tax return and submit a Form 8962 to reconcile those advance payments, even if you
would not otherwise be required to fle a tax return. You also must fle an individual income tax return and
submit a Form 8962 to claim the premium tax credit, even if no advance payments of the premium tax
credit were made for your coverage. For more information, see the instructions for Form 8962.
However, you are not required to fle a tax return solely because you received a Form 1095-B or a Form
1095-C. For example, if you are enrolled in Medicaid, you will receive a Form 1095-B. If you do not have a
tax fling requirement, you do not have to fle a tax return solely because you received the Form 1095-B
reflecting your Medicaid coverage.
The health care law tax fling requirements are the same as last year:
 If you enrolled in coverage through the Marketplace, you must fle a tax return and reconcile any
advance payments of the premium tax credit that were paid on your behalf.
 If you have a fling requirement and everyone in your family had coverage for the entire year, you
should check the full-year coverage box on your tax return.
 If you or any family members did not have coverage for the entire year, you should claim any
applicable coverage exemption or make an individual shared responsibility payment.
16. Should I attach Form 1095-A, 1095-B or 1095-C to my tax return?
No. Although you may use the information on the forms to help complete your tax return, these forms
should not be attached to your return or sent to the IRS. The issuers of the forms are required to send the
information to the IRS separately. You should keep the forms for your records with your other important tax
documents.
Source: Internal Revenue Service

DOL Updates Model FMLA Forms

Document will be available ASAP.

This Compliance Bulletin is not intended to be exhaustive nor should any discussion or opinions be construed as legal advice. Readers should contact legal counsel
for legal advice.
© 2015 Zywave, Inc. All rights reserved.
DOL Updates Model FMLA
Forms
The Family and Medical Leave Act of
1993 (FMLA) gives an eligible
employee the right to take unpaid,
job-protected leave in certain
situations, including the birth,
adoption or foster care placement of a
child, his or her own or a family
member’s serious health condition
and a family member’s military
service.
To administer FMLA leaves, employers
must provide certain notices to
employees, such as a notice
designating whether a requested
leave will qualify as FMLA leave.
Employers may also require that
employees provide certifcations to
substantiate their eligibility for certain
types of FMLA leave.
The Department of Labor (DOL) has
provided model notices and
certifcations to help employers
administer FMLA leaves. The DOL’s
model FMLA forms are optional;
employers may decide to customize
the DOL’s model forms or create their
own FMLA forms. The model FMLA
forms are available on the DOL’s
FMLA Web page.
The DOL’s model FMLA forms expired
on Feb. 28, 2015. After a few months
of extending the expiration date on its
model FMLA forms, the DOL recently
issued updated model forms. The
updated model FMLA forms include
the following changes:
 The updated model forms have an
expiration date of May 31, 2018;
and
 The model certifcation forms that
request medical information have
been updated to include
information on the Genetic
Information Nondiscrimination
Act (GINA).
• The model FMLA forms expired earlier
this year, on Feb. 28, 2015.
• The DOL repeatedly extended the
forms’ expiration date while the forms
were in the process of being updated.
• The DOL recently updated its FMLA
forms.
• The updated forms have an expiration
date of May 31, 2018, and include
information on the Genetic Information
Nondiscrimination Act.
Employers
that use the
model FMLA
forms should
start using the
DOL’s
updated
model forms
as soon as
possible. The
model FMLA
forms are
available on
the DOL’s
FMLA Web
page.
ion Steps: Employers
that use the model FMLA
forms should start using the
DOL’s updated models as
soon as possible. Employers
that have developed their
own forms should review the
DOL’s updated models to
make sure their own medical
certifcation forms contain
GINA information.
Employers should also
confrm that they are usingGINA Requirements
Title II of GINA, which applies to
employers with 15 or more
employees, prohibits employers from
discriminating against employees or
applicants based on genetic
information. GINA is enforced by the
Equal Employment Opportunity
Commission (EEOC).
Under GINA, employers may not
request genetic information, subject
to a handful of narrow exceptions. As
one of these exceptions, GINA permits
employers to request family medical
history as part of the certifcation
process for FMLA leave (or leave
under similar state or local laws or
pursuant to an employer policy),
where an employee is asking for leave
to care for a family member.
This exception does not apply when
an employee is asking for leave
because of his or her own serious
health condition. However, employers
do not violate GINA if they
inadvertently acquire genetic
information. An employer’s receipt of
genetic information in response to a
lawful request for medical information
is inadvertent when the request
specifcally directs the health care
provider not to provide genetic
information.
Updated Model FMLA Forms
The DOL updated the following model
FMLA forms:
 Certifcation of Health Care
Provider for Employee’s Serious
Health Condition (Form WH-380-E);
 Certifcation of Health Care
Provider for Family Member’s
Serious Health Condition (Form
WH-380-F);
 Notice of Eligibility and Rights &
Responsibilities (Form WH-381);
 Designation Notice (Form WH-382);
 Certifcation of Qualifying Exigency
for Military Family Leave (Form WH-
384);
 Certifcation for Serious Injury or
Illness of Covered Servicemember
for Military Family Leave (Form WH-
385); and
 Certifcation for Serious Injury or
Illness of a Veteran for Military
Family Leave (Form WH-385-V).
The DOL updated all of these forms to
include an expiration date of May 31,
2018. Additionally, in response to a
request by the EEOC, the DOL
updated the medical certifcation
forms to include language regarding
GINA’s restrictions on collecting and
maintaining genetic information.